Ask Why and What not How

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In my desire to lead well I have very often asked the wrong questions over the years. I tend to lean toward asking how and not Why. Because how seems like it will get me where I want faster. At times this is true. The problem with asking how is it very often can short-circuit the process that sustains the very things I am desire to obtain.

I never saw this in myself until a kids pastor I respect greatly said “Sam, when you have a platform what are you going to say?” I had honestly never thought of that before. What am I going to say? I had never thought anyone wanted to hear what I had to say.

Gospel-Centered Counseling with Logos Bible Software

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Logos is well-known for their incredible bible software. I have mentioned in other posts how easy it is to do a word search in Logos. The speed in which you can search commentaries and original languages is simply amazing. One of my favorite features they offer is the ability to get a jump-start in your study process by entering a word or scripture and Logos searches all your resources to give you everything you need to get started. Often times it’s that jump-start and clarity that get you going.

Something Logos offers that you might not be aware of is bible classes complete with video, additional reading,  and notes that allow you to follow along. For the purposes of a review on my blog Logos graciously gave me a copy of Elyse Fitzpatrick’s , Gospel-Centered Counseling on Logos Bible Software

Elyse delves deep into the importance of and practical aspects of Gospel Centered Counseling. No matter where you serve in your local church practical and spiritual this mobile education course in counseling and personal and professional development—build the fundamental character principles every growing and learning Christian must have. Elyse Fitzpatrick brings over 24 years’ of biblically-focused counseling to your education, helping you understand the importance of a rock-solid identity in Christ, and teaching you methods for imparting this knowledge to others.

I have listened to several of the videos already and have found them encouraging and practically helpful. Elyse not only gives you practical teaching she walks it through with you by discussing case studies.

Here is a short video of Elyse talking more about her class on the Logos Mobile Education platform.

A Christian Worldview isn’t enough?

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I came across this article via twitter by Stephen Altrogge based on the idea that a Christian worldview isn’t enough for our kids. I then went on to read more of his articles which I enjoyed. So I am sure that my thoughts below are only clarifications, and our disagreements are mostly semantic in nature but I think the clarifications are helpful.

The past 10 years or so of children’s ministry have been marked by the conversation around family ministry. This conversation needs to be had and continues. I believe that families and churches getting on the same pages is key in the facing the next challenge together.  That challenge is a gospel worldview.

We want methods, but we need mystery

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I was reading The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis to my 7-year-old boy. This is my 4th time through the Narnia books. I find so many profound truths littered through Lewis’ brilliant series. The one that struck me last night was from the end of the book. The kids return from many adventures in Narnia and they went to the Professor to tell him why four coats were missing. He believed them because he too had been to Narnia. The Professor told them something quite profound, he said:

You wont get into Narnia again by that route. Nor would the coats be much use by now if you did! Eh? What’s That? Ye, of course you’ll get back to Narnia again someday. Once a King in Narnia, always a King in Narnia. But don’t go trying to use the same route twice. Indeed, don’t try to get there at all. It’ll happen when you are not looking for it.

Sola Scriptura in Kids and Youth Ministry

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I do believe that some people die and go heaven and come back again. I also believe that some people make things up or embellish their stories to gain influence and credibility.

Recently this has come to light. Through an open letter from one of the children who supposedly died and went to heaven. This brief letter is thoughtful and profound. It’s God exulting and pushes people back to the authority of scripture.

An Open Letter from Alex Malarkey “The boy who came back from heaven”

Please forgive the brevity, but because of my limitations I have to keep this short.

I did not die. I did not go to heaven.

I said I went to heaven because I thought it would get me attention. When I made the claims that I did, I had never read the Bible. People have profited from lies, and continue to. They should read the Bible, which is enough. The Bible is the only source of truth. Anything written by man cannot be infallible.

It is only through repentance of your sins and a belief in Jesus as the Son of God, who died for your sins (even though he committed none of his own) so that you can be forgiven may you learn of heaven outside of what is written in the Bible . . . not by reading a work of man. I want the whole world to know that the Bible is sufficient. Those who market these materials must be called to repent and hold the Bible as enough.

In Christ,
Alex Malarkey

This letter was written by a boy whose body is broken due to an unfortunate car accident and it appears that his heart was broken by those who leveraged his situation for personal gain.