Do Saturday Emails Increase Sunday Church Attendance?

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I’m always a sucker for info graphics. I came across this one from the people at unSeminary. I started sending out summaries of my blog posts on Saturdays so this blog post caught my attention. It was fascinating and  the results definitely have made me think. This is something we will start doing at our church at some point. Here are a few interesting findings from the research.

The lost art of moment making.

Derek Jeter

A few days ago Derek Jeter came to a local college to speak to the student athletes and then do a public forum that evening. A friend of mine graciously gave me a pair of tickets. I took my youngest son. We waited over an hour in below freezing temps and it was well worth the wait. I don’t care if you hate the Yankees you have to respect Jeter. He played for the most demanding owner, in the most demanding city with the most demanding media coverage and he did more than survive he played a legendary career.

It was very interesting hearing him talk about his family, the final game, retirement plans. There was one thing that stood out to me and I have been thinking about it ever since he said it. Here is what he said:

6 elements of kids worship

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1. Make it fun – I love fast songs fun songs, we have done “The Roundup” for over 10 years and our kids still love it. The round-up has nothing to do with Jesus it’s just fun. I try to be the best father I can yet I make mistakes our Father in heaven is perfect. If I delight in the sound of my kids having a good time laughing and playing in the next room, imagine how our Father in heaven delights over us. Our father in heaven delights in us when we are simply having fun.

Justice, Mercy, Humility and Ferguson

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Dustin Nickerson is a former children’s pastor who is bursting on to the standup comedy scene. He is a great friend, deep thinker and keen observer of life. For more about Dustin check out his site http://www.dustinnickerson.com/

Ferguson reminds me (maybe us, are we officially an us yet?) of our great desires for both peace and justice. We want this for ourselves and in our best moments, we want it for others even more so.

But we are broken people living amongst brokenness. We see this now as tragedy leads to more tragedy. We see this now as we rush to make our conclusions on the events that happened and how exactly we think others should respond.

People riot, some out of desperation and some for selfish gain. People protest, some out of a desire to bring others down, and some out of the righteous desire to pursue justice.

Simultaneously, some people will dismiss these events, blaming the media for an over inflation of tragic narrative. Some will look to the protesters and rioters and call them fools, disregarding that perhaps their actions are the best way they know how to pursue justice in a trying time. Some people will make these events about something they are not, meanwhile, others will oversimplify.

The Spiritual Discipline of Gratitude  

There are many disciplines in the Christian life. When you start to quantify them you usually get into trouble. Of all the disciplines that can be practiced and demonstrated in the Christian life I believe Gratitude is the singe most important discipline. Gratitude is the byproduct of something we can’t produce ourselves. Gratitude is something we feel when we have been given what we don’t deserve. Gratitude happens when we experience grace and it happens with regularity when we understand grace. Gratitude strikes at the heart of the gospel. If you have ever been to a sporting even in the past 40 years you would have seen the large happy fan of any given team holding up a sign that says John 3:16. “For God so loved the world that he Gave….” Gratitude is us understanding what we have been given and receiving it with joy.