How to ensure your kids will be on “The Bachelor”

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A while back I got hooked for one season of The Bachelor I watched one whole season. That is about 20 hours of my life I’ll never get back. As I was watching the final episode. This thought came to me and I tweeted it “If any of my kids ever appear on the “The Bachelor” then I will have failed as a parent”

I thought it would be fun to do a few posts that will help you ensure your kids will be on “The Bachelor.”  I will list them here and break them down over the next few days.

If you want to ensure your kids will be on the “The Bachelor”
1. Never show your daughter physical affection.
2. Teach your kids that connections are more important than commitment.
3. Teach your kids there is no consequences for their behavior.
4. Give your kids whatever they want.
5. Teach your kids that their self-worth is tied to people’s acceptance of them.

Looking for beta testers

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This time of the year parents should be looking for ways to keep their kids safe. During Christmas kids get more devices that are connected to the internet than any other time during the year. There are several options for you to do this. If you don’t do anything presently you need to. Our kids are connected to the net through video games systems, iPad, tablets, and the list goes on and on. If it has a screen it connects to the web and if it connects to the web you need a proactive strategy to protect your kids.

A friend of mine has developed some software to help keep kids safe online it is to the point where he is looking for beta testers. We need around 25 parents of kids 10 and under. We will take the first 25 families that fit that criteria.

Here is the info from the guy who created the software.

I would like to invite about 25 parents, free access to the beta, and lifetime free access to the product after beta.
-Each parent can create profiles for as many of their children as they like.  Age 10 and under would be ideal
-They should be open to providing feedback on what was easy/hard to use
-They should be willing to share and tag a few links or apps that they have found appropriate for topic and age-range
-The social links between parents will initially be based on email addresses, so they must be willing for that single piece of information to be shared among the beta group.  No information about the children is ever shared.

What you need to do to join the beta testing group is fill out this form and if you qualify you will be contacted with further details.

Parents don’t miss Christmas

Have spiritual conversations with your kids

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I am a huge fan of C. S. Lewis in general and the Narnia series in particular. I read through the Naria series with each of my kids and have stumbled onto something by accident that Lewis did on purpose. Lewis used the imaginary world of Narnia to tell us about the world we live in. He was so brilliant because his imaginary world creates context for things that are hard for kids (and adults for that matter) to grapple with.

Lewis through his series talks about greed, God’s sovereignty, Heaven, Redemption and many more topics. Each of these is difficult because young kids are such concrete thinkers so abstract ideas are difficult to convey. Lewis through the world that he made for us in Narnia gives us what we as parents are so desperately looking for, concrete metaphors for abstract realities.

One of the more profound illustrations of this is found in The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe. Here is what Lewis says

“The White Witch?” said Edmund; “who’s she?”

“She is a perfectly terrible person,” said Lucy. “She calls herself the Queen of Narnia thought she has no right to be queen at all, and all the Fauns and Dryands and Naiads and Dwarfs and Animals—at least all the good ones—simply hate her. And she can turn people into stone and do all kinds of horrible things. And she has made a magic so that it is always winter in Narnia—always winter, but it never gets to Christmas. And she drives about on a sledge, drawn by reindeer, with her wand in her hand and a crown on her head.”

Living in upstate New York, where last winter it didn’t get above 32 degrees for over 9 weeks straight, this illustration hits home. To suffer through a perpetual winter without the joy, hope and life that Christmas brings would be unbearable. I can’t think of a better illustration for life without the advent of Christ. Our life without the joy and hope that Christ brings is cold, lifeless and hopeless. So parents this Christmas use Lewis’ particularly vivid illustration of what life is like without Christ to bring to life the true meaning of Christmas for your kids. To think of life without Christmas for any child is utterly unthinkable. To think of life without Christ should be equally unthinkable.

Merry Christmas.

What makes Taylor Swift so amazing

Why more pop stars should follow her example

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Do I think Taylor Swift is the best singer out there? Do I think Taylor Swift is the greatest songwriter? No. What I so appreciate about Taylor Swift is she gets that she is a role model and she takes it seriously. She doesn’t just use her fan base and their parents to get what she wants most. She gets that she has been given a huge responsibility and she takes that trust very seriously.

In a seemingly unending stream of Disney, pop stars overdoing their sex appeal to shed the Disney moniker thinking somehow that being seen as wholesome is a death-blow to their career. So they drag all their fans generally young girls through their smutty transformation with them. They care more about their success than those who made their success possible.

Love what Taylor says on the subject of her being a role model.
“I definitely think about a million people when I’m getting dressed in the morning. (It) would be really easy to say, ‘You know, I’m 21 now. I do what I want. You raise your kids.’ But that’s not the truth of it. The truth of it is that every singer out there with songs on the radio is raising the next generation.”

Such a powerful statement even more powerful when you understand that Taylor gets her fame. “Every singer out there with songs on the radio is raising the next generation.” Talk about partnering with parents. If more pop stars understood this it would be easier to raise the next generation. Thank you, Taylor Swift, for taking your fame seriously.

You Don’t Need To Be Theologian To Teach Kids.

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In my last post I made the case for systematic theology and why kids need it. I know many of you might be thinking that there is no way that you could teach your kids systematic theology because you don’t really even understand it yourself. Take heart you are not alone. The good news for you is there are many resources that are now available to help your kids and you understand the basic framework of our faith.

Theology is something that is scary for many parents as many of them were never taught theology because much of it was assumed when they were kids. Their parents assumed they understood things about God. The most important thing about our kids is what they think about God. Because that’s true we can leave nothing to chance.

So where do we start. I would not start with Systematic Theology for kids under 6 or 7 for them I would read them books that tell the large story of God as a Redeemer. To do that I would recommend the following books

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The Jesus Story Book Bible by Sally Lloyd-Jones

 

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The Biggest Story by Kevin DeYoung

Once kids have an understanding of the big picture of scripture the parts will make sense. When your kids are between 7 and 8 I would working through a systematic theology with them. There are three that I would recommend this list is by no means exhaustive. I have broken them up into younger, slightly older and older again this is for connivance what is important is you find what works for you family and do that.

Youngest

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Everything a Child Should Know about God by Kenneth Taylor

Young

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The Ology by Marty Machowski

Older Elementary

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Big Truths for Young Hearts by Bruce Ware

Teens

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Bible Doctrine: Essential Teaching of the Christian Faith by Wayne Grudem