Why we need to get rid of Daylight savings.

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Daylight savings is a mixed bag. I really don’t know why we still do it. For church folk we love falling back because everyone gets to church when it actually starts, but hate springing forward because people miss church all together. I jest, when people arrive at church. (I do notice how many church remind people about springing forward on social media but no one reminds people when we fall back) I don’t joke however when it comes to my dislike for daylight savings time. If I had a vote I would vote not just for the ending of daylight savings time but I would go a step further and get rid of a few time zones while we are at it. I got the idea from this very intriguing article

Daylight saving time in the US ends Nov. 3, part of the an annual ritual where Americans (who don’t live in Arizona or Hawaii) and residents of 78 other countries including Canada (but not Saskatchewan), most of Europe, Australia and New Zealand turn their clocks back one hour. It’s a controversial practice that became the official standard in America in 1966 and adjusted throughout the 1970s with the intent of conserving energy.. The fall time change feels particularly hard because we lose another hour of evening daylight, just as the days grow shorter. It also creates confusion because countries that observe daylight saving change their clocks on different days.

It would seem to be more efficient to do away with the practice altogether. The actual energy savings are minimal, if they exist at all. Frequent and uncoordinated time changes cause confusion, undermining economic efficiency. There’s evidence that regularly changing sleep cycles, associated with daylight saving, lowers productivity and increases heart attacks. Being out of sync with European time changes was projected to cost the airline industry $147 million a year in travel disruptions. But I propose we not only end Daylight Saving, but also take it one step further.

To continue reading the rest of the article click here….

How to Kid Proof your iPad

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When I first got my iPhone and iPad one of the more frustrating things for me was the fact my kids would roam all over it changing stuff. Well that and the fact they would use it while eating Cheetos. I have yet to solve the Cheetos issue. I did however, discover that apple come out with a very easy very brilliant way to keep kids at home or at school locked into only the app you want them in.

How to kid proof you iPad in a few basic steps

1. Go to your settings icon > press the general tab >then press the accessibility tab

2. Once in the accessibility tab select > select guided access

8 Years ago today.

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Eight years ago today one the kids in our kids church suddenly went home to be with the Lord. This lead to me to try and  reconcile  how a loving God could do such a thing. Through that process inside my heart of hearts I let go of God, only to find out He never let go of me. One of the means of grace that God used to help me understand the gospel was Sally Lloyd-Jones for that I owe her and Tim Keller a debt I will never be able to repay.

Every year on this day I am filled with sadness and joy because one day, one day. I will see Robert and his family reunited. That is my prayer that is my prayer every day but especially on this day.

BY THE HAND!

When you’re in the dark or on a narrow path, you need someone to lead you by the hand, to hold your hand tight. You need someone to rely on.

God says you can rely on him:

I’ve got you by the hand
And I’ll never let you go!

No matter where you go,
No matter what you do,
You always have
A hand to hold you.

I will lead you,
Guide you,
Keep you,

Even through death
I won’t ever let you go!
(Taken from: Thoughts that Make your Heart Sing, Sally Lloyd-Jones)

3 statements new bloggers need to hear

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Writing is difficult. I often get asked how do I get started in blogging, and with so many blogs out there why should I blog? First of all everyone has something of value to add. The trick is learning how to unearth it yourself. People often know what they want to say but often don’t know how to say it. Here are a few statements that will help you get started and push through.

  1. Be yourself – Find your voice, write what you know, be transparent but not-self absorbed. The reality is that if you are learning or wondering something there is a good chance someone else is looking for information on the very same thing. There are others that have yet to face what you are facing now that you can be a voice to help them when they Google whatever is vexing them. For me the motivation to start my blog was the idea that I wanted to be for others what I wish someone was for me when I started in ministry. This has become my personal mission statement in every area of my life I try to be to others what I wish others were to me.

    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”- Oscar Wilde

  2. Be consistent – Consistent trumps frequency – The Aesop tale of the turtle and the rabbit is the best illustration of how people blog. Many are Rabbit bloggers who start strong and blog in spurs that are often months if not years apart. The turtle bloggers pick a spread and stick with it. For some people that speed is three times a week others it’s once a week. The goal is pushing yourself but setting a speed you can maintain. People get used to the amount of posts you do. I generally shoot for 3x a week. I don’t always hit that mark but most weeks I do.
    The biggest reasons people stop blogging is they run out of ideas to blog about. The best way to overcome this is to use Evernote and keep a rolling blog post note where you add random ideas as they come to you then try to come up with new topics when you sit down to write. If you can’t think of anything consult your rolling blog post note and take an idea off the list. What I have found to be true is the more I blog the more I find to blog about.
  3. Be Generous – Give more than you take. Give away your best idea. I have met bloggers who were full of amazing insight and ideas. I was really impressed I then went to their blog only to be less than impressed. The reason is they were afraid to put their best ideas out there. I am not sure why but whatever the reason it hurts you, your idea and your potential readers. When writing, or creating, whatever you do give your best ideas away.

    Do not hoard your best ideas. Good ideas are like the flu the more you spread them the further they go and the faster they come back to you. I have found that working through my ideas in a public forum has helped me refine and clarify my thoughts. It’s not until I commit my thoughts to paper on a consistent basis that I see for myself what it is that I am thinking about. Blogging or writing regularly in any way allows you to get out of you the things you think about more than you should. Once you see them and others see them you can tell what sticks and what doesn’t.

    “No one has ever become poor by giving” – Anne Frank

 

Death of the 50% myth of marriage.

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50% of marriages end in divorce. Raise your hand if you have never heard that statistic. As far as statistics go it is by far one the most touted, most popular and accepted by everyone as gospel truth. I found an article in the WSJ debunking this stat as a myth. The article was refreshing because it was good news and intriguing because it challenged my assumptions that divorce was increasing. I figured we were in the 60% range headed for the 70%’s. Here’s what the article had to say.

About 70 percent of marriages that began in the 1990s reached their 15th
anniversary (excluding those in which a spouse died), up from about 65
percent of those that began in the 1970s and 1980s. Those who married in
the 2000s are so far divorcing at even lower rates. If current trends
continue, nearly two-thirds of marriages will never involve a divorce,
according to data from Justin Wolfers, a University of Michigan
economist (who also contributes to The Upshot). Via the New York Times

That’s good news! There were some logical reasons for drop in the divorce rate as noted in the article.