Are Miracles Real?

Miracles_Eric_Metaxas

Eric Metaxas is rolling out his new book “Miracles” tomorrow. I had the privilege of reading it in advance. I read “Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy” last year and enjoyed it so much I read several of Eric’s other books. Many of Eric’s latest books were biographical so Miracles in combining theology and biography was a bit of a twist from his most recent offerings. Being part of a church that is Charismatic in expression and Reformed in theological practice, I was interested in the direction Metaxas would take on the supernatural. Knowing his background of Greek Orthodoxy, and that he has attended primarily more mainline denominational churches, I became even more curious on his thoughts concerning the miraculous. To say I was pleasantly surprised is an understatement.

Parents use the Bible

bible
I am not the biggest fan of post apocalyptic films none of them end well. Spoiler alert everyone dies nearly all the time. These movies always freak me out. They are too chaotic for me. There are no rules no sense of social norms. There is very little trust understanding and empathy. It’s Godless, faithless and Darwin on steroids. As I describe what a post apocalyptic movie sounds like many of you are agreeing many of you think I am overstating and simplifying the genre too much. What we all can agree is that if we close our eyes and think about what I just described the picture we are all drawn to is the High School we attended. The food post apocalyptic, the lack of trust and empathy all very real. Darwinism on steroids

While describing High School as post apocalyptic might be overstating things a bit. One thing that has never been true of our world and youth culture is a collective lack of an objective moral standard. The seeds of post modernity were sown years ago and we are just now beginning to reap the first fruits of this harvest.

Free books from Logos

logos free book

If you read books and you should. You should be looking for free books. Logos gives away a free book every month from various authors. Then to make something good even better they offer another offering by that author for only .99 cents.

Octobers offering from Logos is from Jürgen Moltmann’s work “The Crucified God” and for .99 Logos is offering “The Theology of Hope.” Jürgen Moltmann is a German Reformed theologian who is Professor Emeritus of Systematic Theology at the University of Tübingen, and author of several books.

Loved this commentary from my bible reading today:

John 11:28-37
Jesus identifies with us in our pain and loss. He comes to us in our weakness and brokenness. Through he knew he was about to raise Lazarus from the dead, Jesus wept when he saw the tears of Mary and her companions. This is Jesus being truly human. As God incarnate, Jesus shows us what he, as God, created man to be – a whole-hearted lover of God and a compassionate lover of fellow image-bearers – summarized in the two great commandments (Matt. 22:34-40)

But as the incarnate God, Jesus’ tears in front of Lazarus’s tomb are of a different order. This is Jesus feeling the weight of the fall – the violation and disintegration of the way things were meant to be. His holy tears are those of the Creator grieving over the forfeiture of beauty through the intrusion of sin and death. Once again, in the incarnate Lord, we see the heart of the Lamb who would offer his life to overcome our sin and death.

Such a powerful description of Christ’s tears. His holy tears are those of the Creator grieving over the forfeiture of beauty through the intrusion of sin and death.

Gospel Tranformation Bible (Crossway, 2013), pg. 1429