Resources for Kidmin


One of the things I love about going to conferences is discovering new resources. At CPC last week I was given a few resources I want to draw to your attention.

1. Yancy – Yancy has a new Little Praise Party video out. It’s fantastic.
2. D6 – The folks at DC gave me a couple of books One on keeping your kids safe online and the other about the connection of church and family by Dr. Kimmel
3. David C. Cook – Michelle Anthony gave me her new book. Becoming a Spiritually Healthy Family.
4. Disciplr – A brand new curriculum content delivery system from David C Cook that can be used with any curriculum. Be on the lookout this summer.
5. Jumpstart 3 – A band that does scripture memory songs to modern beats. Got to heart their story from the main stage. Love their passion for scripture.

Two Questions that change how you see everything


This past week I was at CPC a conference for Kids Pastors put on by INCM. One of the speakers was Charles Lee found of In the breakout I attended he was talking about clarifying your brand. Towards the end of his breakout he said that in our brand management and in our lives we have to ask ourselves two questions.

  1. What matters most?
  2. What is enough?

Sola Scriptura in Kids and Youth Ministry


I do believe that some people die and go heaven and come back again. I also believe that some people make things up or embellish their stories to gain influence and credibility.

Recently this has come to light. Through an open letter from one of the children who supposedly died and went to heaven. This brief letter is thoughtful and profound. It’s God exulting and pushes people back to the authority of scripture.

An Open Letter from Alex Malarkey “The boy who came back from heaven”

Please forgive the brevity, but because of my limitations I have to keep this short.

I did not die. I did not go to heaven.

I said I went to heaven because I thought it would get me attention. When I made the claims that I did, I had never read the Bible. People have profited from lies, and continue to. They should read the Bible, which is enough. The Bible is the only source of truth. Anything written by man cannot be infallible.

It is only through repentance of your sins and a belief in Jesus as the Son of God, who died for your sins (even though he committed none of his own) so that you can be forgiven may you learn of heaven outside of what is written in the Bible . . . not by reading a work of man. I want the whole world to know that the Bible is sufficient. Those who market these materials must be called to repent and hold the Bible as enough.

In Christ,
Alex Malarkey

This letter was written by a boy whose body is broken due to an unfortunate car accident and it appears that his heart was broken by those who leveraged his situation for personal gain.

The Ten Best Books of 2014

Here are the top ten books I read in 2014 and the reasons why.

  1. Total Truth by Nancy Pearcey

    Total truth was a brilliant call “to awakening evangelical Christians to the need for a Christian “worldview,” which Pearcey defines as “a biblical informed perspective on all reality. I found this book to be foundational in how we see the world through the lens of the gospel. This book is a must read for every kid heading off to college and any youth pastor who works with high school or college age kids. The final section on the flaws in the evangelical church I found both helpful and intriguing.

  2. What’s Best Next by Matt Perman

    I have long been a fan of PeterDrucker. I have read “The Effective Executive” Numerous times. One things I felt was lacking from Drucker’s work and others like him. That was the purpose for productive living and working.Perman does an amazing job connecting practical ways to get things done to an underlying theological framework. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and plan on reading it again soon.

  3. Proof by Daniel Montgomery and Timothy Paul Jones

    I have read a couple of books by Jones and have enjoyed them. I was intrigued by Proof before I read it because from the index you could tell they were tackling the 5 points of Calvinism from a standpoint of grace rather than a forced acronym. Thoroughly enjoyed the book as they portrayed the Grace of God in such a profound way I found myself worshiping and filled with wonder as I read the pages of this book. This book is a must read for anyone who leans toward Calvinism. I don’t often cry when I read a book but there is a story Jones tells of his daughter that moved me to tears. Such a powerful picture of us belonging to God. It’s worth the purchase of the book for that story alone.

  4. Walking With God Through Pain and Suffering – Tim Keller

    This is one of those books that every Christan needs to read as they will encounter pain and loss at some point in their journey. Kellers treatment of suffering does all of us a favor as he so poignantly deals with suffering in such a way that it keeps us from being either trite or melodramatic when addressing the others in pain. Kellers brilliance lies in pointing to our ultimate hope which is Christ. Each chapter ends with areal life story of suffering that I found very hard to read as each one caused my heart to both wrench and rejoice at God’s goodness even if unseen. This book and “A grief observed by Lewis are the best books I have read thus far on the problem of human suffering.

  5. The Good News We Almost Forgot by Kevin DeYoung

    If you have been a follower of my blog for any period of time you will know that I am a huge fan of Catechism. The Good News We Almost Forgot is a weekly devotional that I read as a book because each chapter was so good I couldn’t wait a week. DeYoung brilliantly,pastorally, and devotionally dives into each of the Lord’s Days as laid out by the Heidelberg Catechism. I found myself convicted regularly and sitting there after reading a chapter in an attitude of worship.The relevance of the theology in a 400 year old document is astounding.

  6. Bad Religion by Ross Douthat

    Bad Religion was a paradox because it was difficult to read and hard to put down. Douthat argues that “America’s problem isn’t too much religion, as a growing chorus of atheists have argued; nor is it an intolerant secularism, as
    many on the Christian right believe. Rather, it’s bad religion: the slow-motion collapse of traditional faith and the rise of a variety of pseudo-Christianities that stroke our egos, indulge our follies, and  encourage our worst impulses.” I found it insightful enjoyed the fact that Douthat as a catholic had a great perspective on evangelical and catholic follies alike.

  7. A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23 by Phillip Keller

    I first read this book over 20 years ago in bible college. I read it again this year. Reading the same book 20 years later is interesting. Of all the books I read this year this book hit me hardest. I have been a “full-time shepherd” for nearly 18 years I find that I have become a pretty good Shepherd and at the same time a not so good sheep. As pastors we must not forget that we are sheep first shepherds second. This book does just that. Loved the insight the devotional feel and the loving truths that this book contains.

  8. Compassion Without Compromise by Adam Barr and Ron Citlau

    As a christian if you have not been asked what you believe about the issue of homosexuals and homosexual marriage yet, you will. What are you going to say? When someone you love invites you to a same-sex marriage ceremony what are you going to do? When you as a christian leader are interviewed by a reporter they will ask what you think. What are you going to say. Barr and Citleu offer an amazingly practical and pastoral book that will help you speak the truth in love. As christian we need to be loving but we can’t allow our desireto be loving to derail us from truth.


  9. Evangelism And The Sovereignty Of God by J.I. Packer 

    J.I. Packer is brilliant. I love his high view of both God and Scripture. In  his classic he talks about God’s role in salvation and how we cooperate with God in preaching the gospel. It is a classic on evangelism and should be read by all.

  10. Brothers We Are Not Professionals by John Piper

    I love Pipers passion. I enjoyed this book because he tapped into a passion of mine. That passion is for Pastors to be Pastors rather than savvy CEO’s. The business culture that has crept into the church has helped pastors be better leaders which has some value to be sure. But at what cost? That cost I would say is the erosion of the care of people, the dependence on Holy Spirit. In the United States we have turned the office of pastor into a profession rather than a calling. We need strong leaders in the pastorate but the price the church is paying for that leadership is far too steep and doesn’t honor God. I loved how Piper passionately calls pastors and leaders to the things that matter most. If you are a pastor I beg you to read this book. I pray that it will convict you as much as it convicted me.


Really excited to be a part of D6 this year. I will be doing a couple of breakouts. This is one of the kids ministry conferences I haven’t been to yet. I have heard lots of good things. Really excited to connect with old friends and make new ones.

If you are looking for a conference to attend this year I hope you consider D6. I would love to grab a cup of coffee and hear what God is doing in your church. Please click on the link below and register today.

Date: September 16, 2015—September 18, 2015
Event: D6 Conference - Louisville
Sponsor: D6 Conference
Venue: Galt House Hotel & Suites
Location: 140 N 4th St
Louisville, KY 40202
Public: Public
Registration: Click here to register.
More Info: Click here for more information.