Looking for a Great Bible for Kids 6-9 Years Old

The ICB is a solid option

A while back I wrote a blog post on why you need to make sure your kids have the right Bible. One of the key points in helping your kids love the bible is finding the right bible to transition your kids from a picture/story Bible to a full-text bible. This transition is so important as it is the time when kids typically start to read their Bibles on their own. There are several questions that you should consider in selecting a bible for your 7-10-year-old.

1. Are the illustrations age appropriate?
2. Does it have helps to help kids go deeper?
3. Is the translation readable?

I think the ICB passes each of these tests really well. In particular, the translation of the ICB is very accessible without losing or muddying the original meaning. If kids can’t read their bible because they don’t understand it they will most likely not develop the habit. They also highlight a couple hundred texts that they feel are essential for kids to know. I was given the hardback version of the bible for review but I also downloaded the Kindle version on my iPhone on my own. Many times reference bibles are difficult to navigate in the kindle app the ICB was very simple. There were highlighted words that you could touch that would bring you to more information about them yet returning back to the text was intuitive and easy definitely something to consider if you are looking for a bible on the go, the kindle option is great. If you are looking for more info check out Tommy Neilson’s blog.

If you have kids between 8-12 years old, you definitely want to check this out

Books I read in 2015

In 2015 I read fewer books than 2014 but I definitely grew as a reader.  I always thought that reading more was how you grew as a reader but it’s not true it’s reading better books. It’s reading books that are beyond you that grow you as a reader.  Mortimer Adler says this about reading books –

“Too often, we use that phrase (well-read) to mean the quantity rather than the quality of reading. A person who has read widely but not well deserves to be pitied rather than praised.”

I have been someone who has read widely but not well. This year I began to change that. I hope to continue to do so in each successive year.

I love what Mortimer Adler says about good books at the end of his book on how to read books. He says:

“A good book does reward you for trying to read it. The best books reward you most of all. The reward, of course, is of two kinds. First, there is the improvement in your reading skill that occurs when you successfully tackle a good, difficult work. Second – and this in the long run is much more important – a good book can teach you about the world and about yourself. You learn more than how to read better; you also learn more about life. You become wiser. Not just more knowledgeable-books that provide nothing but information can produce that result. But wiser, in the sense that you are more deeply aware of the great and enduring truths of human life….These are matters about which you cannot think too much or too well. The greats books can help you to think better about the, because they were written by men and women who thought better than other people about them.”

This was always my problem I was reading books to become more knowledgeable but that knowledge was limited because it addressed only a specific problem. When you read better books. When you read the books that your favorite authors, favorite author, favorite author wrote you see things differently. You no longer have knowledge about a topic you see more deeply, you enter the conversation rather than catch the highlights, because you see the border picture you see the whole argument not simply parts of it.

Here are the books I read in 2015.

1. Platform by Michael Hyatt
2. The Martian – Andy Weir
3. Expositional Preaching – David Helm
4. The Lion The Which and the Wardrobe – C. S. Lewis.
5. A Tale of Three Kings – Gene Edwards
6. Out of the Silent Planet – C.S. Lewis
7. Creativity, Inc. By Ed Catmull
8. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone – by J. K. Rowling
9. The Tale of Despereaux by Katie DiCamillo
10. Show Them Jesus by Jack Klumpenhower
11. Culture Making by Andy Crouch
12. John Newton: From disgrace to amazing grace by Jonathan Aitkin
13. The Prodigal Church by Jared Wilson
14. What does the Bible really teach about homosexuality? By Kevin DeYoung
15. The Things Of Earth. by Joe Rigney
16. The Horse and His Boy by CS Lewis
17. True Spirituality – Francis Schaeffer
18. Hand in Hand by Randy Alcorn
19. The Republic by Plato
20. Finding Truth by Nancy Pearcy
21. Preaching by Timothy Keller
22. A Free People’s Suicide by Oz Guinness
23. The Book Thief – Markus Zusak
24. Harry Potter And The Chamber of Secrets – J. K. Rowling
25. Judges For You – Tim Keller
26. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
27. Prince Caspian by CS Lewis
28. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J. K. Rowling
29. Poetics by Aristotle
30. Theogony by Hesiod
31. How to Read a Book Mortimer J Adler
32. The Survivor – Vince Flynn
33. Prometheus Bound – Aeschylus
34. Oedipus The King – Sophocles
35. Hippolytus – Euripides
36. Apology – Plato
37. Clouds – Arisophanes
38. The Bacchae – Euripides

Looking for beta testers

This time of the year parents should be looking for ways to keep their kids safe. During Christmas kids get more devices that are connected to the internet than any other time during the year. There are several options for you to do this. If you don’t do anything presently you need to. Our kids are connected to the net through video games systems, iPad, tablets, and the list goes on and on. If it has a screen it connects to the web and if it connects to the web you need a proactive strategy to protect your kids.

A friend of mine has developed some software to help keep kids safe online it is to the point where he is looking for beta testers. We need around 25 parents of kids 10 and under. We will take the first 25 families that fit that criteria.

Here is the info from the guy who created the software.

I would like to invite about 25 parents, free access to the beta, and lifetime free access to the product after beta.
-Each parent can create profiles for as many of their children as they like.  Age 10 and under would be ideal
-They should be open to providing feedback on what was easy/hard to use
-They should be willing to share and tag a few links or apps that they have found appropriate for topic and age-range
-The social links between parents will initially be based on email addresses, so they must be willing for that single piece of information to be shared among the beta group.  No information about the children is ever shared.

What you need to do to join the beta testing group is fill out this form and if you qualify you will be contacted with further details.

What makes Taylor Swift so amazing

Why more pop stars should follow her example

Do I think Taylor Swift is the best singer out there? Do I think Taylor Swift is the greatest songwriter? No. What I so appreciate about Taylor Swift is she gets that she is a role model and she takes it seriously. She doesn’t just use her fan base and their parents to get what she wants most. She gets that she has been given a huge responsibility and she takes that trust very seriously.

In a seemingly unending stream of Disney, pop stars overdoing their sex appeal to shed the Disney moniker thinking somehow that being seen as wholesome is a death-blow to their career. So they drag all their fans generally young girls through their smutty transformation with them. They care more about their success than those who made their success possible.

Love what Taylor says on the subject of her being a role model.
“I definitely think about a million people when I’m getting dressed in the morning. (It) would be really easy to say, ‘You know, I’m 21 now. I do what I want. You raise your kids.’ But that’s not the truth of it. The truth of it is that every singer out there with songs on the radio is raising the next generation.”

Such a powerful statement even more powerful when you understand that Taylor gets her fame. “Every singer out there with songs on the radio is raising the next generation.” Talk about partnering with parents. If more pop stars understood this it would be easier to raise the next generation. Thank you, Taylor Swift, for taking your fame seriously.

Why Kids Need Hymns and Carols.

 

When I was a kids pastor at the ripe age of 21 I did then what I find unthinkable now. I wouldn’t sing Christmas songs in kids church and never would sing hymns. As I think back I can’t even remember why I felt that way. I think I felt that kids wanted to have fun and Hymns were above their pay grade. I think I thought Christmas Carols were things you heard in stores not songs of praise sung in church. What changed my perspective was being in the same church for 20 years. Seeing the kids grow up that I had taught in preschool I realized that I had made a couple of mistakes.

One mistake was thinking that fun mattered more than substance. If I made it crazy enough they would come back. I’m all for fun but not at the price of substance. The other mistake I made is I thought I was helping kids with the faith that they need today rather than preparing them for the faith they are going to need. As kids pastors we have to give them a faith for today but we also have to prepare them for the faith they are going to need.

  We must give our kids a faith that is big enough they can grow into. Kids also need to be connected to the history of our faith. The need to know that God loves them yes, but many people have lived a life of uncompromising faith they can to by God’s grace.