3 things I learned from Infuse: Ask Good Questions

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One of the greatest things I got out of Infuse was a good ole fashion verbal butt woopen from Bro Jim. I went to a “Spend-a-week” Conference with Bro Jim and I didn’t even say Hi to him. I never asked a question and I never waited to speak to anyone. I always felt I would be bothering him or other speakers at a conference. I have learned that isn’t true at all and honestly it’s changed everything.

CS Lewis says “True humility is not thinking less of yourself; it is thinking of yourself less.”

I decided that I was going to get over myself and grow. Here is where we have add a disclaimer we have to know why we want to grow. If you are talking to Reggie Joiner because you want to impress him. Do you need affirmation Reggie that you can and should only find in Christ or do you want to learn from Reggie because you want to be a more capable servant.

3 Things I learned from Infuse

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Over five years ago I signed up for Infuse. It was something new. Not a lot of people were doing coaching at the time. I didn’t really know what to expect. I remember contacting my friend Kenny and talking with him about it. We both decided to do it. It would turn out to be and answer to prayer that I prayed 10 years earlier asking God to send someone across my path that could help me avoid stupid mistakes in ministry. Through it God used helped to clarify my life mission.

If you are asking what is Infuse? Great question. Infuse is a 6 month coaching program like no other. You get to personally connect with Jim Wideman who has led Children’s and Youth Ministry for more than 30 years. Infuse is part discipleship part conference part facebook. If you are in kids and youth ministry I would strongly urge you to consider Infuse. It’s all the best parts of a conference for 6 months rather than 3 days.

Over the next few days I am going to talk about the three things that I have learned from Infuse.

1. Ask good questions
2. Staff level volunteers
3. Practice Thankfulness

Leading well means leading others well

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Everyone is a leader. The first and most important person we each lead is ourselves. Those who lead themselves well often end up leading others. To lead others well you must learn how to identify and bolster the strengths of those you lead. In the Effective Executive, Drucker address the concept of leading others well by recognizing and developing the strengths they posses.

When leading people in your organization in such a way that you develop their strengths Drucker prescribes four basic rules.

1. Create a job that can be done. Far to many organizations and churches create a job that only a genius can fill and only a savant can accomplish. We want the perfect person sometimes to our own fault.

Drucker says He knows that the test of organization is not genius. It is its capacity to make common people achieve uncommon performance.

Drucker, Peter F. (2009-10-06). The Effective Executive (Harperbusiness Essentials) (p. 80). HarperCollins. Kindle Edition.

2. The job needs to be demanding and big. This does not contradict point one but is a further clarification of it. If you want uncommon people to do uncommon things to use and develop their strengths that will only happen through intentional clarity. You don’t grow someones strengths by being vague and grandiose but by creating a position that forces them to grow and learn in the confines of organizational and positional clarity.

Leader be proactive

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One of the biggest mistakes leaders can make is to wait to be told something. You will never affect change by waiting for change to happen to you. When leaders do decided to do something what they ask often is “What do you want me to do?” If you want to grow in your ability to lead others don’t ask “what do you want me to do?” Ask “What can I contribute?”

Executives who do not ask themselves, “What can i contribute?” are not only likely to aim too low, they are likely to aim at the wrong things. Above all, they may define their contribution too narrowly. – Peter Drucker

Ask Tim Keller Transcript via @Cambassador21

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Questions from yesterdays Ask Tim Keller courtesy of Cameron Moore follow him on twitter at @Cambassador21

Ask TK 7/28/14

Q: Favorite puritan?
TK: That’s easy, John Owens because Jonathan Edwards is not technically a Puritan.

Q: Favorite Lewis book?
TK: Another easy one: Mere Christianity.

Q: What is your opinion of “praying in tongues”?
TK: I like Don Carson’s book “Showing the Spirit” on this one. Balanced, thoughtful, and rooted in Scripture.

Q: Was there ever a point in the last several years that you questioned your role in ministry? TK: When Kathy was sick a few years ago, I questioned if I should leave ministry for a while.

Q: Do you envision a time where we will see a “consolidation” of Christian denominations? church seems too fragmented
TK: As long as The Church strives for both unity AND purity there will always be denominations.

Q: Shake Shack or In­N­Out?
TK: Easy, Shake Shack in NYC. Better quality meat.

Q: Advice for young educators? (I teach English lit to 12­17 year olds)
TK: Similar to a question last time: At that age they need Christianity modeled more than explained.­­Doesn’t have to be Christian education, just modeling your faith is important for 12­17 year olds.

Q: Favorite Doctor [Who]?
TK: David Tennant. Bonus: Favorite episode is “Blink.” Of course.

Q: Have you read Harry Potter­ if yes, did you like them… If no­ why not?
TK: Yes loved them, great examples of sacrificial love conquering evil reminds me of another story.

Q: Favorite coffee shop in NYC?
TK: None. I don’t drink coffee. I’m a Harney and sons Tea kind of guy, not to mention PG Tips.

Q: Most influential book on pastoring?
TK: Charles Bridges “The Christian Ministry” and Richard Baxter’s “The Reformed Pastor” and William Still’s book on pastoring

Q: What is your favorite movie?
TK: The Black Stallion