My interview with Matt Perman on Gospel Productivity.

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I recently read a book entitled What’s Best Next: How the Gospel Transforms the Way You Get Things Done” By Matt Perman. Here is my review of the book I did a few weeks back. I loved the book how it tackled the whole issue of productivity from the standpoint the great commandment and the great commission. I often talk with my team and tell them we are not efficient with people we are efficient with problems so we can extend grace to people. That’s the heart beat of this book. After I finished reading this book I reached out to Matt to do a blog interview below is that interview.

1. You talk a lot about the need to eliminate and create larger chunks of time – Drucker starts time management by telling executives they need to “Know thy Time” You didn’t mention in your book to specifically track where your time goes. Was this on purpose?  

This is a great question, because originally I did have a section talking about the importance of tracking your time. Tracking your time is an important step because, as Drucker points out, you can’t manage your time unless you know where it actually goes. And, unfortunately, our memories are almost always wrong on this. The only way to truly know where your time goes is to track it. Once you track your time (for a period of about two weeks), then you identify the time wasters, cut them out, and consolidate the time that remains.

I cut those pages out in part due to the need to reduce page count and in part because tracking your time is just plain really hard to do. I wanted to develop a system that was as uncomplicated as possible and that people would actually do. I didn’t think most people would actually take the advice of tracking their time. If I had it to do over again, though, that is something I would probably update, or at least include in a footnote.

2. I loved your list of books to read at the end of each chapter. As a reader I found it exciting and also expensive. If you could recommend just one book as the next book to read after reading What’s Best Next what would that book be?

The one book I would recommend reading after What’s Best Next is Tim Sanders’s book Love is the Killer App. The reason is that it is all about the importance of generosity as the best way to succeed at work, which is one of the most important principles I emphasize in What’s Best Next.  

The good and the bad of the ice bucket challenge

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Let me start off by saying ALS is an awful disease. I am grateful to hear that donations over the past two weeks are at 1.35 million versus 22,000 over last year. That’s great news. I hope that some headway if forged in finding a cure for this fatal disease. I have known personally a few people who have gotten ALS it is a tragic diagnosis with no hope of recovery other than divine healing.

If you have Facebook or have been on the internet doing anything for the past week you will have seen everyone from Bill Gates to Martha Stewart pouring buckets of ice on their heads. They are doing this to be part of the ice bucket challenge where someone challenges you to give 100$ or pour a bucket of ice on your head. You video tape the ice being poured on your head and then challenge 3 friends to do the same.

3 things I learned from Infuse: Thankfulness

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This is the last of the series of posts I have done talking about the three things that have most affected my life and ministry as a result of being part of Infuse. Those three posts.

1. Three things I learned from Infuse: Introduction
2. Three things I learned from Infuse: Ask good questions
3. Three things I learned from Infuse: Staff Level Volunteers
4. Three things I learned from Infuse: Thankfulness

The greatest thing I have learned from Infuse is the discipline of thankfulness. In life and ministry few things will destroy you like a lack of gratitude. Life is tough. Working in ministry can be thankless. The result is that we are tempted to see only the things that are frustrating and everything we see and do is based on that frustration. A lack of gratefulness taints all we do.

Francis Shaeffer says it better than I ever could:

The beginning of man’s rebellion against God was,  and is the lack of a thankful heart.

Tim Keller says:

Worry is not believing God will get it right Bitterness is thinking God got it wrong.

3 things I learned from Infuse: Staff Level Volunteers

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One of the traps the enemy uses to marginalize leaders is envy. If I only had a bigger building. If I only had more staff. If I only had a bigger budget. The reality is that no matter how we don’t like to admit it none of us are immune from these thoughts. I know that I have struggled with each of these at different points in ministry. I remember having a conversation with a kids pastor who had less kids than we had and had 3 staff members to help. I left the call with this overwhelming feeling of frustration and discouragement. I remember actually breaking out a calculator adding up how many kids we had and what my staff to kids ratio should be.

It was on an Infuse call I asked Jim Wideman at what point is it reasonable to get help. Our church had grown and our kids ministry nearly tripled in a few months. Jim said I could use some help that having at least an assistant seemed reasonable but help never came like I expected it.

What we can learn from Mark Driscoll and Acts 29

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There has been a lot of buzz around the internet about the removing of Mars Hill and its founding pastor Mark Driscoll from the church network he helped to create Acts 29. There are ideas, theories flying and everyone it seems is picking a side and digging in for virtual battle.

I won’t go into the details of the situation because that is covered in detail by other posts. Basically the Acts 29 Board felt sufficient cause for concern for Mark Driscoll, his church and the Acts29 that they have chosen to remove Mark and his church from any affiliation with the Acts 29 network.

This is a pretty significant step. You don’t typically see this type of action in many churches or church organizations particularly by an organization towards its co-founder. Mark Driscoll is a very polarizing person he says things strongly and clearly. I don’t know Mark but I do know that isn’t necessary a bad thing. We need leaders, particularly as orthodox viewpoints of theology are under assault from every side, to stand up and speak boldly. I do know a couple of people who have worked for him and none of them have ever said anything disparaging concerning his behavior.