Teach your kids that connections are more important than commitment

connections

If you want to ensure your kids will be on the “The Bachelor”
1. Never show your daughter physical affection.
2. Teach your kids that connections are more important than commitment.
3. Teach your kids there is no consequences for their behavior.
4. Give your kids whatever they want.
5. Teach your kids that their self-worth is tied to people’s acceptance of them.

The next thing ever parent must do to ensure that their kids will end up on “The Bachelor” is teach them that connections are more important than commitment.

If you have watched more than one episode of The Bachelor I know that you will join me in a collective gagging sound whenever you hear the word “Connection.”  They use it ALL the time. “I feel like we have such a strong connection.” “I feel like we really connected, our connection is so different from the rest of the girls here” It’s so shallow and such a travesty that we have reduced a monogamous committed marriage between a man and a woman to  goose-bumps felt over a glass of champagne.

In The Bachelor this guy dates all these girls telling each of them that he feels a “real connection” with each of them, they all fall in love with him and he sends them home devastated because no one taught them a connection is not a commitment. Our culture preaches if it feels good do it, divorce is always an option and that falling out of love is as easy as falling into love. We have to change that for our kids.

Never show your daughter physical affection.

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If you want to ensure your kids will be on the “The Bachelor”
1. Never show your daughter physical affection.
2. Teach your kids that connections are more important than commitment.
3. Teach your kids there is no consequences for their behavior.
4. Give your kids whatever they want.
5. Teach your kids that their self-worth is tied to people’s acceptance of them.

One of the biggest problems in our country is fatherlessness. Now am I advocating that every girl that comes from a fatherless home will have problems in life? Absolutely not. What I am advocating is that as a father I want to do everything I can do to ensure that my baby girl grows up with a healthy view of men and woman.

As a father with your kids you have a very real and very sober responsibility to teach your kids what a real man is like. 

As a dad you are your sons first hero and your daughters first love. If you stop and think about it there is literally not a place in our culture that shows a positive view of men and especially fathers. Every example I can think of is stupid, dopey, irrelevant and aloof.

How to ensure your kids will be on “The Bachelor”

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A while back I got hooked for one season of The Bachelor I watched one whole season. That is about 20 hours of my life I’ll never get back. As I was watching the final episode. This thought came to me and I tweeted it “If any of my kids ever appear on the “The Bachelor” then I will have failed as a parent”

I thought it would be fun to do a few posts that will help you ensure your kids will be on “The Bachelor.”  I will list them here and break them down over the next few days.

If you want to ensure your kids will be on the “The Bachelor”
1. Never show your daughter physical affection.
2. Teach your kids that connections are more important than commitment.
3. Teach your kids there is no consequences for their behavior.
4. Give your kids whatever they want.
5. Teach your kids that their self-worth is tied to people’s acceptance of them.

3 Reasons Why Kids Need Systematic Theology

Theology

I know what you are thinking “Isn’t that a bit much for kids?” 50 years ago I would have agreed with you even 20 years ago. Today is a different day.  There are many reasons for this, but I think DA Carson’s analysis is most concise in this matter. He says,”One generation knows the gospel the next assumes the gospel the third generation denies the gospel.”

When I was growing up as a kid, and I believe even my first few years as a children’s pastor we lived in a season where the gospel was assumed. As a kid, there were no sports or school activities on Wednesday night so kids could go to youth group. Stores were closed on Sunday so people could spend time with family and observe the Sabbath. We lived in a culture that Christian ideas thoughts and standards for better or worse pervaded our country.  In the south, this is still true to some extent. I think the feeling when I was growing up was that you didn’t need to give kids as deep of a grounding in doctrine and truth because it was everywhere. There was stuff you learned for sure, but I think many things were assumed. As parents and as pastors we can no longer assume anything. We live in arguably the most secular age our country has ever seen. We must proactively teach our kids the stories of the Bible but also the truth underneath the stories and most importantly the person to whom those truths and stories point.

That is the context for why we need to teach our kids systematically here are a few reasons why it matters.

Gone but not forgotten.

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Most leaders if they are honest will tell you one of their biggest fears is they would give their life and energy to someone or something only to be forgotten once they move on. I have thought about this a lot lately what will people take away from your contribution to your church, family, field.

Here are a few random thoughts I have been thinking and praying over.

1. When I leave a conversation do people think I am important or did I make them feel important

2. The people you poured into will always outlast anything you build.