Ask Aaron Reynolds a question.

Aaron
Just wanted to extend an invitation to anyone who attended Pipeline as well as people who regularly read my blog. Aaron Reynolds has graciously offered to answer any question you have for him concerning kids ministry. I appreciate Aaron’s willingness to do this.

If you have a question he will check my blog all week and will answer you questions for you. I encourage you to ask because what you will get is a real life practical answer based on years of experience. Ask away and be prepared for some insightful practical suggestions that will help you grow your leadership.

Thanks again Aaron you are such a blessing.

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6 thoughts on “Ask Aaron Reynolds a question.

  1. Aaron,

    What are your thoughts about using technology (i.e. videos, moving lights, interactive quizzing systems, ect) in children's ministry? What is the best leverage of technology that you have seen? What is the worst use of technology that you have seen? Is it possible that we are now relying to much on technology in children's ministry?

  2. Aaron,

    What are your thoughts about using technology (i.e. videos, moving lights, interactive quizzing systems, ect) in children’s ministry? What is the best leverage of technology that you have seen? What is the worst use of technology that you have seen? Is it possible that we are now relying to much on technology in children’s ministry?

  3. Hey Matt,

    I'm all for using technology like DVDs, lights, game show buzzers, interactive quizzes and all the rest. But I think the challenge is that we sometime expect the technology to make up for otherwise boring lessons or lame biblical content, and the truth is that it can't pull it off. Technology gives us a wonderful set of new tools to use in our toolbelt, but at the end of the day, they are just more tools, not THE silver bullet. We have to start with dynamic transformational lessons. Lessons that are creative in their own right, that teach in experiential, visual, kinesthetic ways, that make the Bible unapologetically relevant and specific and applicable to a kid's life. That's the foundation, and can be done powerfully in very simple non-techie ways.

    I think we do rely on technology too much if we think it has some super power that can make up for great storytelling and powerful application. If we think video games in the lobby and cool moving lights can take the place of powerful teaching, no way. But layer that stuff on top of transformational teaching…well now you've got it where it belongs. That's one of the reasons I'm not a huge fan of all-DVD teaching curriculums. DVD and video are wonderful tools, but at the end of the day, they can't take the place of a powerful moment being brought to life right in front of you.

    The best leverage of technology I've seen is when it infuses itself seamlessly into powerful live teaching…often in simple ways. A simple fade to black with a musical transition brought up to transition from a teaching moment to a worship set…or track #8 from "The Prince of Egypt" soundtrack brought under a storyteller to give the story emotional punch…these seamless uses are often the most powerful. Quizzes that require kids to run across the room, eat a twinkie and ring a bell are much more wholistically involving that just having a cool pad that lets me buzz in my answer. Technology is usually most effective when it's invisible…when it doesn't draw attention to itself.

    Worst? I hate the way we've come to use Powerpoint. Like, just because we put some words on a slide, we've done something special. It's still just words! If I have a verse to show, rather than jumping to Powerpoint as the easy go-to, I always challenge myself to come up with something tactile and real. For example, a roll-style window shade mounted sideways with the verse painted on it…and when I need to reference the verse, I grab it and pull it across the stage. Using Powerpoint to just show words…at the end of the day…is just more words. Yes, I understand that Powerpoint is easy and a verse-painted window shade takes more time and effort. But the pay-off is always more memorable. How do we get tactile…and visual…beyond just words?

    Great question, Matt!

  4. Hey Matt,

    I’m all for using technology like DVDs, lights, game show buzzers, interactive quizzes and all the rest. But I think the challenge is that we sometime expect the technology to make up for otherwise boring lessons or lame biblical content, and the truth is that it can’t pull it off. Technology gives us a wonderful set of new tools to use in our toolbelt, but at the end of the day, they are just more tools, not THE silver bullet. We have to start with dynamic transformational lessons. Lessons that are creative in their own right, that teach in experiential, visual, kinesthetic ways, that make the Bible unapologetically relevant and specific and applicable to a kid’s life. That’s the foundation, and can be done powerfully in very simple non-techie ways.

    I think we do rely on technology too much if we think it has some super power that can make up for great storytelling and powerful application. If we think video games in the lobby and cool moving lights can take the place of powerful teaching, no way. But layer that stuff on top of transformational teaching…well now you’ve got it where it belongs. That’s one of the reasons I’m not a huge fan of all-DVD teaching curriculums. DVD and video are wonderful tools, but at the end of the day, they can’t take the place of a powerful moment being brought to life right in front of you.

    The best leverage of technology I’ve seen is when it infuses itself seamlessly into powerful live teaching…often in simple ways. A simple fade to black with a musical transition brought up to transition from a teaching moment to a worship set…or track #8 from “The Prince of Egypt” soundtrack brought under a storyteller to give the story emotional punch…these seamless uses are often the most powerful. Quizzes that require kids to run across the room, eat a twinkie and ring a bell are much more wholistically involving that just having a cool pad that lets me buzz in my answer. Technology is usually most effective when it’s invisible…when it doesn’t draw attention to itself.

    Worst? I hate the way we’ve come to use Powerpoint. Like, just because we put some words on a slide, we’ve done something special. It’s still just words! If I have a verse to show, rather than jumping to Powerpoint as the easy go-to, I always challenge myself to come up with something tactile and real. For example, a roll-style window shade mounted sideways with the verse painted on it…and when I need to reference the verse, I grab it and pull it across the stage. Using Powerpoint to just show words…at the end of the day…is just more words. Yes, I understand that Powerpoint is easy and a verse-painted window shade takes more time and effort. But the pay-off is always more memorable. How do we get tactile…and visual…beyond just words?

    Great question, Matt!