4 reasons NOT to send your kids to Public school

Here are the reasons that should make you think twice before sending your kids to public school

1. Class size - Public school is publicly funded so it is the default choice of many. As a result there are more kids per grade than Christian and Homeschool. It is not even an option for even the best of teachers to give the individual attention your child could get at a Christian School or if you Homeschooled.

2. Wasted time -
Being in a large group you inevitably wait for the kid that is the slowest in everything from lunch to class work. This leads to kids who are quick learners and eaters to have extra time to either be bored or to fill it with less than noble actions. (How do I know this I was a quick eater and quick learner)

3. Lack of personal connections -
Again with so many kids in their care schools have to take measures to maintain safety. Any time you gain safety you give up freedom. I find it difficult to let my son walk to his Kindergarten class by himself and never have a chance to get to know his teacher or allow her to know us. We have gone out of our way to know his teacher and she has gone out of her way to know us but it hasn’t been easy.

4. You don’t know what they teach –
It is difficult not knowing what curriculum is used but also not knowing what frame of reference a teacher may have. There are many great teachers but a bad teacher can have long term effects that are very difficult to recover from. Sort of connected to this is a huge pet peeve of mine politicians who force teachers in New York  to teach for the test. Because teachers have to do this it makes it difficult to create a lifelong love of learning in kids. I hate that.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

13 thoughts on “4 reasons NOT to send your kids to Public school

  1. Sam,
    I agree my wife and I chose to start our kids in a Christian school until moving to PA. At first the move and all the rules on homeschooling here in PA forced us to put our children back in public schools. IT was a terrible time for my youngest 3. My oldest did well in a public school but he had a Christian school education up to 7th grade. The others did not have that benefit and struggled with all of the pressures and the "teaching for tests" meaning, the teachers had to teach to help their students past the achievement tests so the schools could get funding. We pulled our kids and now have them doing a cyber charter school, The difference is amazing, we have regular contact with teachers, we know the curriculum, kids can do reports on Christian subjects without harassment and no more teaching for tests. They still must do the achievement tests here in PA but, the teacher do more than teach for those

  2. I agree that these are concerns to take into account, but I see them more as "counting the cost" rather than reasons to discount a public school education. In my experience as being a student in the worst junior high in my district as well as now being a parent with kids in a school that does not rank high in our school district, there are hard working teachers doing their absolute best to teach kids being creative with the resources available to them. The key in making a difference is what happens at home. Whether or not parents can be directly involved within the school, they can have influence in the life of their child and how they view learning, what they learn and know their kids well enough to step in when needed. My parents did that for me, and I am doing that for my kids.

    Great thoughts, Sam… can't wait for the rest of the posts!

  3. Ok, I don't usually comment, but I'll bite this time. I should probably preface this by saying that I am a product of public schools (K-12), rec'd my undergrad from a Christian university, and graduated from Bethel Sem last spring (MACFM). My husband has been a public school teacher (middle school) and is now Tech Director in a public school district. My two kids (15 and 17 y.o.) both attended Christian preschool thru kindergarten and have attended our local public schools since 1st grade.

    My firm belief is that there is no one right answer for every child – some will do fine in public schools, others in private Christian schools or homeschooling. (I know of families who have had their different children in each of the three settings.) I have always maintained that regardless of where my kids' "attended" school, we would be homeschooling. As Henry said above, "the key in making a difference is what happens at home." Regardless of the setting that your child receives their education, parent involvement is key in their young lives. There is a great mission field in the public schools – my 15 y.o. daughter is a great evangelist and not at all ashamed to stand up for and share what she believes.

  4. Sheepishly coming back to say I just now saw that there was an earlier post presenting the other side. I'm so sorry. I hope my comment didn't sound overly critical of this post. Each of these posts presents great thoughts and things to consider. Every parent must evaluate their individual child's needs, learning styles, personality, and more as they prayerfully consider the best options.

  5. Sam,
    I agree my wife and I chose to start our kids in a Christian school until moving to PA. At first the move and all the rules on homeschooling here in PA forced us to put our children back in public schools. IT was a terrible time for my youngest 3. My oldest did well in a public school but he had a Christian school education up to 7th grade. The others did not have that benefit and struggled with all of the pressures and the "teaching for tests" meaning, the teachers had to teach to help their students past the achievement tests so the schools could get funding. We pulled our kids and now have them doing a cyber charter school, The difference is amazing, we have regular contact with teachers, we know the curriculum, kids can do reports on Christian subjects without harassment and no more teaching for tests. They still must do the achievement tests here in PA but, the teacher do more than teach for those

  6. I agree that these are concerns to take into account, but I see them more as "counting the cost" rather than reasons to discount a public school education. In my experience as being a student in the worst junior high in my district as well as now being a parent with kids in a school that does not rank high in our school district, there are hard working teachers doing their absolute best to teach kids being creative with the resources available to them. The key in making a difference is what happens at home. Whether or not parents can be directly involved within the school, they can have influence in the life of their child and how they view learning, what they learn and know their kids well enough to step in when needed. My parents did that for me, and I am doing that for my kids.

    Great thoughts, Sam… can't wait for the rest of the posts!

  7. Ok, I don't usually comment, but I'll bite this time. I should probably preface this by saying that I am a product of public schools (K-12), rec'd my undergrad from a Christian university, and graduated from Bethel Sem last spring (MACFM). My husband has been a public school teacher (middle school) and is now Tech Director in a public school district. My two kids (15 and 17 y.o.) both attended Christian preschool thru kindergarten and have attended our local public schools since 1st grade.

    My firm belief is that there is no one right answer for every child – some will do fine in public schools, others in private Christian schools or homeschooling. (I know of families who have had their different children in each of the three settings.) I have always maintained that regardless of where my kids' "attended" school, we would be homeschooling. As Henry said above, "the key in making a difference is what happens at home." Regardless of the setting that your child receives their education, parent involvement is key in their young lives. There is a great mission field in the public schools – my 15 y.o. daughter is a great evangelist and not at all ashamed to stand up for and share what she believes.

  8. Sheepishly coming back to say I just now saw that there was an earlier post presenting the other side. I'm so sorry. I hope my comment didn't sound overly critical of this post. Each of these posts presents great thoughts and things to consider. Every parent must evaluate their individual child's needs, learning styles, personality, and more as they prayerfully consider the best options.

  9. You've nailed it with your reasons for and against. I am pro public school for my kids(not everyone has this call) for all the reasons you stated and more. Daily I see the horrible flaws in the system and have to stand in the gap for my kids–we pray and are involved. I hope my kids will know how to live in this world and share their faith no matter what they come against. I love that my kids invite anyone to church and are exposed to classrooms of kids that don't share their faith. They each learn to wrestle with it and stand up for the love that Christ calls them to. I had a Jewish parent tell me that my daughter was the only loving one to her daughter–she said my kinder stood up and was her friend when others were picking on her for being different. I've taught in public schools and have been a children's pastor–and I can say that my faith and walk with Christ seems to be the most awake when I'm loving on people who don't know Christ yet–and I hope this will be true for my kids!

    • Love this. My son's teacher has come to church 2x at our church I am not sure if she is a christ follower or not but I do know because my son is in her class she has heard the gospel at least twice. She is a lovely woman and I am thankful she does what she does.

  10. You've nailed it with your reasons for and against. I am pro public school for my kids(not everyone has this call) for all the reasons you stated and more. Daily I see the horrible flaws in the system and have to stand in the gap for my kids–we pray and are involved. I hope my kids will know how to live in this world and share their faith no matter what they come against. I love that my kids invite anyone to church and are exposed to classrooms of kids that don't share their faith. They each learn to wrestle with it and stand up for the love that Christ calls them to. I had a Jewish parent tell me that my daughter was the only loving one to her daughter–she said my kinder stood up and was her friend when others were picking on her for being different. I've taught in public schools and have been a children's pastor–and I can say that my faith and walk with Christ seems to be the most awake when I'm loving on people who don't know Christ yet–and I hope this will be true for my kids!

    • Love this. My son's teacher has come to church 2x at our church I am not sure if she is a christ follower or not but I do know because my son is in her class she has heard the gospel at least twice. She is a lovely woman and I am thankful she does what she does.

  11. I resonate with Shelly. We choose to send all three of our boys to large public schools in the Chicago suburbs, as a way for them to learn how to reach a hurting world. And yes it has taken some extra work on our part to make sure they had all their academic needs met. But one of our boys is a senior this year, heading off to college in the Fall, and I think his testimony shows God’s blessing on this act of faith.

    In the last few months alone he has seen school friends ,that he built into the last four years, come to Christ; he was able to minister to classmates when one of their friends passed away suddenly; and most of all, for the last two years he has served as a peer counselor. I have lost count of the number of kids where he intervened because these kids were ready to commit suicide or were cutting themselves. I just asked him how many it has been over the last four years. We counted 8 kids! And really it was 8 kids who needed a peer to listen to them, to let them know there was hope, and to guide them to the help they needed. 8 kids lives that could have had VERY different outcomes. I will be forever thankful that we choose the path of public schools as a way for our kids to learn to reach a hurting world with the love of Jesus. And on a day in Holy week when I remember that we have a savior who washed the feet of his disciples, I would not have changed any aspect of this decision.