Every Christian is a theologian. We are always engaged in the activity of learning about the things of God. We are not all theologians in the professional sense, academic sense, but theologians we are, for better or worse. The ‘for worse’ is no small matter. Second Peter warns that heresies are destructive to the people of God and are blasphemies committed against God. They are destructive because theology touches every dimension of our lives. The Bible declares that as a man thinks in his heart, so is he…Those ideas that do grasp us in our innermost parts, are the ideas that shape our lives. We are what we think. When our thoughts are corrupted, our lives follow suit. All know that people can recite the creeds flawlessly and make A’s in theology courses while living godless lives. We can affirm a sound theology and live an unsound life. Sound theology is not enough to live a godly life. But it is still a requisite for godly living. How can we do the truth without first understanding what the truth is? No Christian can avoid theology. Every one has a theology. The issue, then, is not, do we want to have a theology? That’s a given. The real issue is, do we have a sound theology? Do we embrace true or false doctrine?

RC Sproul

Loved this commentary from my bible reading today:

John 11:28-37
Jesus identifies with us in our pain and loss. He comes to us in our weakness and brokenness. Through he knew he was about to raise Lazarus from the dead, Jesus wept when he saw the tears of Mary and her companions. This is Jesus being truly human. As God incarnate, Jesus shows us what he, as God, created man to be – a whole-hearted lover of God and a compassionate lover of fellow image-bearers – summarized in the two great commandments (Matt. 22:34-40)

But as the incarnate God, Jesus’ tears in front of Lazarus’s tomb are of a different order. This is Jesus feeling the weight of the fall – the violation and disintegration of the way things were meant to be. His holy tears are those of the Creator grieving over the forfeiture of beauty through the intrusion of sin and death. Once again, in the incarnate Lord, we see the heart of the Lamb who would offer his life to overcome our sin and death.

Such a powerful description of Christ’s tears. His holy tears are those of the Creator grieving over the forfeiture of beauty through the intrusion of sin and death.

Gospel Tranformation Bible (Crossway, 2013), pg. 1429

Jim Collins writes in his introduction to Drucker’s classic text Management. He writes:

Business and social entrepreneur Bob Buford once observed that Drucker contributed as much to the triumph of free society as any other individual. I agree. For free society to function we must have high-performing, self-governed institution in every sector, not just in business, but equally in the social sectors. Without that, as Drucker himself pointed out, the only workable alternative is totalitarian tyranny. Strong institutions, in turn, depend directly on excellent management….and no individual had a greater impact on the practice of management and no single book captures its essence better than his seminal text, Management.

Matt Perman
What's Best Next (Zondervan, 2014), 305-306

Here are two questions from Matt Perman to help you identify your life goal.

1. What would I do if I had all the money I needed and could do whatever I wanted?
2. What would I do if I could do only one thing in the next three years?

The point of the first question is to allow you to think big, without logistical constraints,  so that you can truly identify what fires you up. The point of the second question, then, is to identify which of these things is truly most important to you by forcing you to choose just one thing.

Matt Perman
What's Best Next (Zondervan, 2014), 174