Of man’s first disobedience and the fruit
Of the forbidden tree whose mortal taste
Brought death into the world and all our woe
With loss of Eden till one greater Man
Restore us and regain the blissful seat

John Milton

Paradise Lost (New York: W. W. Norton, 2005), 3

Simeon and Anna represented all who saw that their only hope was in the mercy and grace of God. Along with the poor carpenter and his wife and the outcast shepherds, they were flesh-and-blood examples of those to whom Christ comes. They personified the paradox of being profoundly empty and profoundly full

R. K. Hughes

R. K. Hughes
Luke: that you may know the truth (Crossway Books, 1998), 95
Found this quote so convicting. I turn to so many things before I turn to scripture. I so often view scripture as helpful rather than essential. Seeing the scripture as sufficient will fundamentally change your life.

The word of God is perfect and complete, giving us all we need to know about Christ, salvation, and godliness. Or as the church father Athanasius put it, “The sacred and divinely inspired Scriptures are sufficient for the exposition of the truth.” 2

Of the four attributes of Scripture, this may be the one that evangelicals forget first. If authority is the liberal problem, clarity the postmodern problem, and necessity the problem for atheists and agnostics, then sufficiency is the attribute most quickly doubted by rank-and-file churchgoing Christians.

Kevin DeYoung

Kevin DeYoung
Taking God At His Word (Crossway, 2014), p. 45

Desire becomes sin when it fails to include love of God or men. Further, I think there are two practical tests as to when we are coveting against God or men; first, I am to love God enough to be contented; second, I am to love men enough not to envy.

When I lack proper contentment, either I have forgotten that God is God, or I have ceased to be submissive to him. We are now speaking about a practical test to judge if we are coveting against God. A quiet disposition and a heart giving thanks at any given moment is the real test of the extent to which we love God at that moment.

Francis A. Schaeffer

Francis Schaeffer
True Spirituality (Tyndale House Publishers, 1971), pg. 8

To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything, and your heart will certainly be wrung and possibly be broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact, you must give your heart to no one, not even to an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements; lock it up safe in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket — safe, dark, motionless, airless — it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable.