4 keys to talking with your child

If you make up answers your kids will find out because they can Google it with their nintendo DS. Crazy! The result of this onslaught of information is that we have to be pro active and not reactive with our parenting and with our information dissemination. It is sometimes tempting to lie to your kids but the problem is they will find out and more than likely sooner than later. If you lie to your kids or don’t satisfy their curiosity they will begin looking to other sources to find answers. You will lose a golden opportunity to build trust and establish much-needed lines of communication you will benefit from your entire life.

To give your kids direct answers to their questions you need do 4 things.

1. Know your kids –

If you have more than one kid you know that each kid is unique. It never ceases to amaze me that two kids growing up in the same house with the same parents eating the same food can turn out so differently. Pat answers frustrate kids because they know you are just trying to get out of a conversation that you are either to busy for our frustrated with. When you really take the time to know each of your kids their strengths their weaknesses you will know how to answer the questions they are asking.

Youth Culture and the New Relevance

christianity_orthodoxy_1920x1080Having served in kids ministry for 15 years and working in youth ministry for much of that time, it seems there has come a shift.  There has been a shift is our country as well as the Christian subculture.

You will often hear cultural experts talking about kids leaving their faith and how these kids need to be reached. We need to stem the rising tide. In our eagerness to solve this dilemma, we are making the wrong conclusions. We think the problem is a lack of relevance. We think our faith is not “hip” enough for the kids. So we create these algorithms of success that sounds like this: cool music + awesome lights + the perfect amount of fog = Jesus might be ok after all. Lights and music aren’t the problem it’s that we have prescribed the wrong medication. We have misapplied relevance and have actually given kids more of what they don’t need and less of what they are actually looking for.

Excited to be a part of CPC again this year. I will  be a Breakout Speaker.  I will be presenting 2 Breakouts:

  1. Be a Pastor- Not Just a Leader
  2. Theology and Kids Ministry

Looking forward to connecting with Kids Pastors and leaders from around the country. Leave me a quick note if you are planning on going this year. I would love to meet you.

Date: January 21, 2015—January 24, 2015
Event: Children’s Pastors Conference East
Topic: Theology and Kids Ministry
Sponsor: INCM
Venue: Chattanooga Convention Center
(423) 756-0001
Location: 1150 Carter St
Chattanooga, Tennessee 37402
Public: Public
Registration: Click here to register.
More Info: Click here for more information.

Looking to save time? Check out TextExpander


Friend and fellow blogger JC Thompson recently told me about an application that saves you time by simplifying repetitive emails, forms or formatting of documents.

The idea behind TextExpander is simple: it substitutes something that you type (usually something short) with something else (usually longer and more complicated) in almost any situation where you can enter text. TextExpander substitutions, called snippets, can be complex and extraordinarily helpful: they can include formatted text, images, the current date or time, fields where you fill in information on the fly, the clipboard contents, and more.
– Michael E. Cohen

What is essential to being a leader?


Love this quote from Kip Tindell CEO of The Container Store

“While I certainly value intellectual intelligence, a capable leader must also possess emotional intelligence. I think that’s the key to being really successful. These individuals keep their egos in check and remain sensitive to the needs of others. Instead of being driven by deep seated insecurities, emotionally intelligent leaders are comfortable surrounding themselves with people who are better than they are in certain areas, and they rank high on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs where self-esteem, awareness, honesty, and objectivity are concerned. Business is not a zero-sum game. In other words, someone else doesn’t have to lose in order for you to win. The best leaders both understand and embrace that type of thinking.” – Kip Tindell

How can we as leaders be to other people what we wish they were to us?