Parents don’t miss Christmas

Have spiritual conversations with your kids

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I am a huge fan of C. S. Lewis in general and the Narnia series in particular. I read through the Naria series with each of my kids and have stumbled onto something by accident that Lewis did on purpose. Lewis used the imaginary world of Narnia to tell us about the world we live in. He was so brilliant because his imaginary world creates context for things that are hard for kids (and adults for that matter) to grapple with.

Lewis through his series talks about greed, God’s sovereignty, Heaven, Redemption and many more topics. Each of these is difficult because young kids are such concrete thinkers so abstract ideas are difficult to convey. Lewis through the world that he made for us in Narnia gives us what we as parents are so desperately looking for, concrete metaphors for abstract realities.

One of the more profound illustrations of this is found in The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe. Here is what Lewis says

“The White Witch?” said Edmund; “who’s she?”

“She is a perfectly terrible person,” said Lucy. “She calls herself the Queen of Narnia thought she has no right to be queen at all, and all the Fauns and Dryands and Naiads and Dwarfs and Animals—at least all the good ones—simply hate her. And she can turn people into stone and do all kinds of horrible things. And she has made a magic so that it is always winter in Narnia—always winter, but it never gets to Christmas. And she drives about on a sledge, drawn by reindeer, with her wand in her hand and a crown on her head.”

Living in upstate New York, where last winter it didn’t get above 32 degrees for over 9 weeks straight, this illustration hits home. To suffer through a perpetual winter without the joy, hope and life that Christmas brings would be unbearable. I can’t think of a better illustration for life without the advent of Christ. Our life without the joy and hope that Christ brings is cold, lifeless and hopeless. So parents this Christmas use Lewis’ particularly vivid illustration of what life is like without Christ to bring to life the true meaning of Christmas for your kids. To think of life without Christmas for any child is utterly unthinkable. To think of life without Christ should be equally unthinkable.

Merry Christmas.

What makes Taylor Swift so amazing

Why more pop stars should follow her example

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Do I think Taylor Swift is the best singer out there? Do I think Taylor Swift is the greatest songwriter? No. What I so appreciate about Taylor Swift is she gets that she is a role model and she takes it seriously. She doesn’t just use her fan base and their parents to get what she wants most. She gets that she has been given a huge responsibility and she takes that trust very seriously.

In a seemingly unending stream of Disney, pop stars overdoing their sex appeal to shed the Disney moniker thinking somehow that being seen as wholesome is a death-blow to their career. So they drag all their fans generally young girls through their smutty transformation with them. They care more about their success than those who made their success possible.

Love what Taylor says on the subject of her being a role model.
“I definitely think about a million people when I’m getting dressed in the morning. (It) would be really easy to say, ‘You know, I’m 21 now. I do what I want. You raise your kids.’ But that’s not the truth of it. The truth of it is that every singer out there with songs on the radio is raising the next generation.”

Such a powerful statement even more powerful when you understand that Taylor gets her fame. “Every singer out there with songs on the radio is raising the next generation.” Talk about partnering with parents. If more pop stars understood this it would be easier to raise the next generation. Thank you, Taylor Swift, for taking your fame seriously.

Simeon and Anna represented all who saw that their only hope was in the mercy and grace of God. Along with the poor carpenter and his wife and the outcast shepherds, they were flesh-and-blood examples of those to whom Christ comes. They personified the paradox of being profoundly empty and profoundly full

R. K. Hughes

R. K. Hughes
Luke: that you may know the truth (Crossway Books, 1998), 95

The blessings in suffering

Update from Sandra

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I want to start by sincerely thanking everyone for all you have done for my family and me. I will not forget your kindness. Every card, prayer, donation and helping hand has helped us more than you know. Thank you.

This time has been challenging for me and my family. It has been the hardest thing we have faced together. I have not felt as weak and as helpless as I do right now. Every day I have to trust God for his help and strength to take things one day at a time.

But even at this time I see the blessings in the midst of my pain. I see my oldest son so strong and stable like we have never seen him before. I see the heart of my second son willing to drop everything to make me toast or simply pick up toys laying in the living room. I hear my oldest daughter pray for me and tell me she loves so much and my youngest who is two, turns to me and says “your going to be fine mom, don’t be scared” then hands me her favorite blankie. I can’t help but see that as God at work in the lives of my kids. That is a blessing to me. It’s a blessing that has to come through hardship that wouldn’t have been seen any other way, and I’m thankful. There is blessing in suffering, I see it and I feel it.

Things you can pray for with me:

  • That my nausea will subside that my strength would increase daily.
  • During Christmas, my blood counts will be at their lowest pray that I will be healthy and strong.
  • Health for my kids.
  • I have to take shots to increase my white blood cell counts – They produce achy bones and flu-like symptoms
  • Most of all pray that at the end of these three months I won’t need any more treatments or radiation.

Merry Christmas,
Sandra

Why Kids Need Hymns and Carols.

Yancy Kidmin Worship Project

 

When I was a kids pastor at the ripe age of 21 I did then what I find unthinkable now. I wouldn’t sing Christmas songs in kids church and never would sing hymns. As I think back I can’t even remember why I felt that way. I think I felt that kids wanted to have fun and Hymns were above their pay grade. I think I thought Christmas Carols were things you heard in stores not songs of praise sung in church. What changed my perspective was being in the same church for 20 years. Seeing the kids grow up that I had taught in preschool I realized that I had made a couple of mistakes.

One mistake was thinking that fun mattered more than substance. If I made it crazy enough they would come back. I’m all for fun but not at the price of substance. The other mistake I made is I thought I was helping kids with the faith that they need today rather than preparing them for the faith they are going to need. As kids pastors we have to give them a faith for today but we also have to prepare them for the faith they are going to need.

  We must give our kids a faith that is big enough they can grow into. Kids also need to be connected to the history of our faith. The need to know that God loves them yes, but many people have lived a life of uncompromising faith they can to by God’s grace.